Should you take Dietary Supplements?

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The typical American diet has much to be desired. According to research, our plates are deficient in a variety of critical micronutrients, including calcium, potassium, magnesium, and vitamins A, C, and D. It's no surprise that more than half of us go for a supplement bottle to acquire the nutrients we require. Many of us take supplements not just to compensate for what we're lacking, but also to provide ourselves with an extra health boost—a preventative buffer to fight off sickness.


What exactly are dietary supplements?

Vitamins, minerals, herbs, amino acids, and enzymes are examples of dietary supplements. Dietary supplements are sold in a variety of formats, including tablets, capsules, soft gels, gelcaps, powders, and liquids.


Advantages of taking Dietary Supplements

Some supplements can help ensure that you obtain enough of the important elements your body needs to operate properly, while others can assist lower your risk of disease. However, supplements should not be used in place of entire meals, which are required for a healthy diet - so make sure you consume a variety of foods as well.

Supplements, unlike drugs, cannot be promoted for the aim of treating, diagnosing, preventing, or curing illness. This indicates that supplements should not make illness-related claims like "lowers high cholesterol" or "treats heart disease." Such claims cannot be made properly for dietary supplements. Nutracore Supplements offers the best quality supplements in the town, you can also order vitamins, protein powder, and other dietary supplements from their website.


Is there any danger in using supplements?

Yes. Many supplements contain active ingredients with powerful biological effects on the body. This may make them hazardous in some conditions and may harm or complicate your health. The following behaviors, for example, might have serious – even life-threatening – implications.

  • Putting supplements together
  • Using supplements in combination with medications (whether prescription or over-the-counter)
  • Supplements as a replacement for prescription medications
  • Taking excessive amounts of some supplements, such as vitamin A, vitamin D, or iron
  • Some supplements can potentially have unfavorable side effects before, during, and after surgery. As a result, be sure to tell your healthcare professional, including your pharmacist, about any supplements you're taking.

What can I do to learn more about the dietary supplement I'm taking?

Dietary supplement labels must include the manufacturer's or distributor's name and address.

If you wish to learn more about the product you're using, ask the manufacturer or distributor about:

  • Information to back up the product's claims
  • Information on the product's ingredients' safety and efficacy.

Report Issues to the FDA

Notify the FDA if the use of a dietary supplement resulted in a severe reaction or sickness for you or a family member (even if you are not certain that the product was the cause or you did not visit a doctor or clinic). Take the following steps:

  1. Use the product no longer.
  2. To find out how to solve the problem, contact your healthcare practitioner.
  3. Problems can be reported to the FDA in one of two ways:
    1. In your region, contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator.
    2. Use the Safety Reporting Portal to submit a safety report online.

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